Book - 2007
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'Arms and the man I sing of Troy...'So begins one of the greatest works of literature in any language. Written by the Roman poet Virgil more than two thousand years ago, the story of Aeneas' seven-year journey from the ruins of Troy to Italy, where he becomes the founding ancestor of Rome, is a narrative on an epic scale: Aeneas andhis companions contend not only with human enemies but with the whim of the gods. His destiny preordained by Jupiter, Aeneas is nevertheless assailed by dangers invoked by the goddess Juno, and by the torments of love, loyalty, and despair. Virgil's supreme achievement is not only to revealRome's imperial future for his patron Augustus, but to invest it with both passion and suffering for all those caught up in the fates of others.Frederick Ahl's new translation captures the excitement, poetic energy, and intellectual force of the original in a way that has never been done before. Echoing the Virgilian hexameter the verse stays almost line for line with the original in a thrillingly accurate and engaging style. This is anAeneid that the first-time reader can grasp and enjoy, and whose rendition of Virgil's subtleties of thought and language will enthrall those already familiar with the epic. An Introduction by Elaine Fantham, and Ahl's comprehensive notes and invaluable indexed glossary complement the translation.
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
ISBN: 9780192832061
Characteristics: lvii, 468 p. : ill., maps ; 21 cm.
Additional Contributors: Ahl, Frederick 1941-


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